The Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program is a four year pharmacy professional program that follows the successful completion of two years of undergraduate (pre-professional) college course work. The first three years of the program are focused mainly on didactic class instruction coupled with introductory pharmacy practice experience.

Course Description

THE PROFESSIONAL YEAR 1 (FIRST SEMESTER)

The year 1 consists of two semesters. The first semester provides 17 hours of academic credit and consists of seven required courses.

  • Pharmacology I, PHPS-301. This course is the first-half of a two-semester course designed to provide pharmacy students with fundamental knowledge related to the actions and effects of drugs on man.  While the course emphasizes basic pharmacology rather than applied therapeutics, appropriate clinical material is necessarily included at times to elucidate essential pharmacologic concepts. Effort is made to integrate pharmacology instruction with biochemical and physiological concepts that were introduced to students during early years in the program.  The course is structured to be neither so detailed that students are overwhelmed by the volume of material to be mastered, nor so simplistic that they are deprived of fundamental background material essential to a broad understanding of drug mechanisms.  The lectures emphasize drug classes and prototypes rather than repetitive details about individual drugs.  Attention is focused on drug mechanism(s) of action, pharmacodynamics, toxic effects and important interactions with other drugs, generally following an introduction or review of the basic biology underlying the topic of discussion.  Credit 4 (4-0)
  • Medicinal Chemistry I, PHPS-303. A course that provides the chemical basis for the interdisciplinary field of therapeutics. The health care team looks up to the pharmacist as it is the only member with chemical expertise. It is therefore vital that the pharmacist retains this expertise in the chemistry of drugs. This course is devoted to the study of synthetic entities and natural products, which are either therapeutic agents per se or are components of medicinal preparations. It familiarizes the student with the chemistry of organic medicinal agents necessary for effective professional practice. While geared to furnish relevant information on the chemistry of drugs in contemporary use, sufficient emphasis is also placed on basic principles enabling the practitioner to maintain competence in drug chemistry throughout his/her professional career.  This course is also related to and/or serves as a foundation to other courses in Pharmacy Curriculum. Credit 4 (3-1)
  • Pharmaceutics I, PHPS-305. This required course focusing on understanding the physicochemical principles of medications and their applications to the design and development of different pharmaceutical dosage forms. The basic principles that will be covered in this course include drug development and regulatory process, physicochemical and biopharmaceutical considerations in dosage form design, solutions and buffers, chemical kinetics and stability, rheology, interfacial phenomena, disperse system basics, suspensions, emulsions, pharmaceutical polymers, and introduction to drug delivery. Credit 3 (3-0)
  • Pharmacy Math, PHPS-307This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of pharmaceutical calculations that are required in the compounding and dispensing of a prescription. Students will apply appropriate mathematical concepts using typical situations that are encountered during the practice of pharmacy. The course will emphasize aspects of basic mathematics and logical skills needed to perform pharmaceutical and clinical calculations essential to ensure that the right dose and strength of a medication or nutritional are given. The pedagogy for this course is predominately didactic lectures. Credit 1 (1-0)
  • IPPE-I, PHPP-300. The goal of this Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience 1 (PHCS-301) is to give students hands on experience in the drug distribution process of both the inpatient and the outpatient areas (e.g. dispensing, compounding, and Drug Information) and introduce students to patient care activities (e.g. taking medication histories, performing medication reconciliation and learning from preceptors how to solve problems related to medications. At each introductory practice experience site, the pharmacist designated as preceptor serves as the student’s main contact. Students are likely to interact with many staff members in the department of Pharmaceutical Care. Credit 1 (0-1)
  • Introduction to Pharmacy, PHPP-301This course provides the Pharmacy student with an introduction to the American healthcare delivery system and to the profession of pharmacy. Masterial center on health delivery models, the environment in which healthcare is rendered, and interdisciplinary care with a focus on the roles of the pharmacist. Students will learn about a variety of career opportunities and will self-assess their potential interest using the APhA Pathways Program. Credit 2 (1-1)
  • Communication Skills, PHPP-302. Communications Skills is a two-credit hour, letter graded, lecture and case discussion course offered to first year pharmacy students.  It is designed to introduce the student to the role of a pharmacist as a problem solver and a patient educator.  It also teaches the students how to communicate verbally and in writing with the health care professionals caring for patients. Course content includes general communication skills in the patient care setting, patient counseling, interviewing, documentation. Application of the concepts learned in the classroom will be demonstrated by the students in case discussions. Credit 2 (1-1)

 

 


 

THE PROFESSIONAL YEAR 1 (SECOND SEMESTER)

The second semester of the year 1 consists of 18 hours of academic credit and consists of six required courses.  As mentioned earlier the Immunization course is copyrighted by another organization.

 

  • Pharmacology II, PHBS-302. This is the second course in the two semester pharmacology series.  The materials cover central nervous system medications, antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, and cancer chemotherapy medications. The course also addresses issues in the area of toxicology. The pedagogy for this course is didactic lecture.  Credit 4 (4-0)
  • Medicinal Chemistry II, PHBS-304. This is a continuation of the first semester of Medicinal Chemistry.  Content of this course is sequenced with the materials being presented in Pharmacology II. The pedagogy for this course is primarily didactic lecture, but does have several large and small group recitation sessions. Credit 4 (3-2)
  • Pharmaceutics, PHBS-308. This is the second course in the three part series on pharmaceutics.   This course addresses the use of solid dosage, topical, transdermal, rectal, nuclear, and lyophilized dosage formulations.  Targeted drug delivery is also presented.  The pedagogy for this course is didactic lecture. Credit 4 (4-0)
  • Pharmacy Compounding, PHBS-309.  This is the final course in the three part series on pharmaceutics. This course focuses on the compounding of a variety of dosage forms.  The pedagogy for this course consists of didactic lectures and experiential learning in a compounding laboratory. Credit 2 (1-4)
  • Self Care and Nonprescription Drugs, PHCS-303.  This is a course designed to acquaint the student pharmacist with the principles of self-care and disease prevention, uses, adverse reactions, and contraindications of nonprescription (over-the-counter, OTC) drugs. The pedagogy for this course is didactic lecture. Credit 3 (3-0)
  • Introduction to Patient Care, PHCS-304.  This is the first course in a series that introduces student pharmacists to the clinical setting and applications of pharmacotherapy.  This course uses an active learning pedagogy that consists of problem-based and critical thinking sessions.  It is held in a hospital setting.  Credit 1 (0-2)

 

 

 


 

THE PROFESSIONAL YEAR 2 (FIRST SEMESTER)

The year 2 consists of two semesters. The first semester provides 17 hours of academic credit and consists of six required courses and one elective course.  Because our pre-pharmacy curriculum contains many of the traditional basic science courses (e.g., anatomy and physiology, microbiology, biochemistry) students are able to begin clinical courses in the fall of the second professional year.

 

  • Therapeutics I, PHCS-401. This course consists of lectures designed to develop the student’s ability to apply principles and concepts of clinical therapeutics to the care of patients with specific illnesses.  The focus of this course is entirely in the cardiovascular arena. There is a self-study module on interpretation of laboratory values that is owned by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists and can be purchased and completed independent of this agreement.  The pedagogy for this course is primarily didactic lecture, but most lecturers use some active learning techniques.   Credit 3 (3-0)
  • Therapeutics II, PHCS-402. This course is a continuation of the therapeutics series and consists of lectures and recitations designed to develop the student’s ability to apply principles and concepts of clinical therapeutics to the care of patients with specific illnesses. This course focuses on renal and pulmonary therapeutics, but also includes fluid and electrolytes and acid base management. The pedagogy for this course is primarily didactic lecture, but most lecturers use some active learning techniques. Credit 3 (3-0)
  • Patient Assessment, PHCS-403. This course is designed to teach interpretation of clinical laboratory tests and skills of health assessment necessary to evaluate patient response to drug therapy. The pedagogy for this course is didactic lecture and experiential learning in a simulation laboratory.     Credit 2 (1-2)
  • Pharmacokinetics and Dose Optimization, PHCS-404. An introduction to concepts and techniques involved in quantitative processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of drugs. The didactic material and assigned problems emphasize current pharmacokinetic literature and familiarize the students with the latest advances in this rapidly expanding area. This course uses a blended pedagogy of didactic lecture and problem-based recitation sessions.           Credit 4 (3-2)
  • Pharmacy Practice Management and Pharmacoeconomics, PHCS-405. This course acquaints students with the principles of management including planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling a practice, business, or organization. Attention is focused on management of capital, time, inventory, and human resources. The pedagogy for this course is didactic lecture. Credit 3 (3-0)
  • Design and Conduct of Clinical Research Studies, PHCS-406. The objective of this course is to outline for students and trainees the process of conducting clinical research from a scientific, ethical, regulatory and managerial perspective. Educational activities that will complement various didactic presentations include review of original research articles, observation of an ongoing clinical research project, and preparation and presentation of a clinical research protocol by the participants. Credit 2 (2-0).

 

 


 

THE PROFESSIONAL YEAR 2 (SECOND SEMESTER)

The second semester of the year 2 consist of 17 hours of academic credit and consists of eight required courses. 

  • Therapeutics III, PHCS-413. This course consists of lectures designed to develop the student’s ability to apply principles and concepts of clinical therapeutics to the care of patients with specific illnesses. This course is almost exclusively infectious diseases and their treatment. The pedagogy for this course is primarily didactic lecture, but most lecturers use some active learning techniques. Credit 3 (3-0)
  • Therapeutics IV, PHCS-414. This course consists of lectures designed to develop the student’s ability to apply principles and concepts of clinical therapeutics to the care of patients with specific illnesses. This course focuses on transplantation, HIV and nutritional support.  The pedagogy for this course is primarily didactic lecture, but most lecturers use some active learning techniques. Credit 3 (3-0)
  • Applied Pharmacokinetics, PHCS-415. This course consists of lectures and recitations on the practical application of pharmacokinetic theory as it relates to the individualization of patient drug therapy, through the proper interpretation of drug serum concentrations. This course uses a blended pedagogy of didactic lecture and problem-based recitation sessions. Credit 2 (1-2)
  • Pharmacogenomics, PHCS-407. This course is designed to educate students on the importance and application of patient-specific genetic information to individualization of pharmacotherapy.  The course begins with a review of essential principles of genetics with an emphasis on genetic variation. The course goes on to develop the concept that individual variability in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response is related in many instances to genetic variation.  The impact of genetic variation is key to drug metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters, and receptor drug targets and is explored in general as well as in a disease-specific context. Finally, students learn about the ethical and legal implications stemming from the availability of genetic information. This course uses pedagogy of didactic lecture. Credit 2 (2-0)
  • Medication Therapy Management (MTM), PHCS-408. The course explores the area of MTM services and medication use by patients and health professionals from a social systems perspective with emphasis on information and behavior. This course is not designed to make students experts in MTM, nor totally prepare them to start their own MTM practice after graduation. It is designed, however, to give students a good foundation on the practice and theory of MTM, a better understanding of various MTM practice settings, and provide students with practical MTM activities (during Recitation) to make them more comfortable with the MTM process.  This course uses a blended pedagogy of didactic lecture and problem-based recitation sessions. Credit 3 (2-2)
  • Applied Therapeutics I, PHCS-409. This is the first course in a two part small group series.  The course introduces student pharmacists to clinical setting and application of pharmacotherapy. Students learn to interview patients, review a medical record, present a patient case and defend a care plan. Students also construct SOAP notes on each patient.  This course uses an active learning pedagogy that consists of problem-based and critical thinking sessions. The materials associated with this course are included in the cost of the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience Program Credit 2 (0-2).
  • Introduction to Pharmacy Practice (IPPE), PHCS-412:  This is the second course in the IPPE series. Please see description under IPPE-I, PHCS-301. Credit 1 (0-2)
  • Research Proposal, PHCS-400. Prerequisite: Second year standing. This course includes the proposal writing of the Pharm. D. research project. A grade will be submitted upon the successful submission and final approval of the proposal by the Pharm. D. Research Committee.Credit1 (1-0)

 

 


 

THE PROFESSIONAL YEAR 3 (FIRST SEMESTER)

The first semester provides 17 hours of academic credit and consists of seven required courses. The following required courses are covered by this contract.

 

  • Therapeutics V, PHCS-515. This course is a continuation of the therapeutics series. It consists of lectures designed to develop the student’s ability to apply principles and concepts of clinical therapeutics to the care of patients with specific illnesses. The focus is on pediatric and adult oncology and management of secondary issues (e.g., pain, nausea and vomiting, infection). The pedagogy for this course is primarily didactic lecture, but most lecturers use some active learning techniques. Credit 4 (4-0)
  • Therapeutics VI, PHCS-516. This course is a continuation of the therapeutics series. It consists of lectures designed to develop the student’s ability to apply principles and concepts of clinical therapeutics to the care of patients with specific illnesses. This course addresses neurology and psychiatric management. The pedagogy for this course is primarily didactic lecture, but most lecturers use some active learning techniques. Credit 3 (3-0)
  • Applied Therapeutics II, PHCS-512. This is the first course in a two part small group series.  The course introduces student pharmacists to clinical setting and application of pharmacotherapy. Students learn to interview patients, review a medical record, present a patient case and defend a care plan. Students also construct SOAP notes on each patient.  This course uses an active learning pedagogy that consists of problem-based and critical thinking sessions. The materials associated with this course are included in the cost of the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience Program Credit 2 (0-2)
  • Introduction to Pharmacy Practice (IPPE), PHCS-513:  This is the third course in the IPPE series. Please see description under IPPE-I, PHCS-301. Credit 1 (0-2)
  • Selected Topics in Therapeutic I, PHCS-520. This is the first of a four course advanced series, each focusing on a certain disease state. Credit 2 (2-0)
  • Selected Topics in Therapeutic II, PHCS-521. This is the second of a four course advanced series, each focusing on a certain disease state. Credit 2 (2-0)
  • Pharm. D. Research, PHCS-511. This course includes the final report on the research project that was proposed and approved in P-2 Year. The report must meet all the standards for Pharm. D. research projects defined by the Pharm. D. Research Committee. Credit 3 (3-0)

 

 


 

THE PROFESSIONAL YEAR 3 (SECOND SEMESTER)

The second semester of the year 3 consist of 18 hours of academic credit and consists of eight required courses.

 

  • IPPE Community, PHCS-524. This course focuses on the basic principles and practices of community pharmacy. Credit 4 (0-4)
  • IPPE Institutional, PHCS-525. This course focuses on the basic principles and practices of institutional hospital pharmacy. Credit 4 (0-4)
  • Pharmacy Law, PHCS-501: This course emphasizes the application of pertinent laws, rules and regulations to the practice of pharmacy. It considers both the legal and the ethical issues surrounding different practice, situations. It also emphasizes where and how to obtain new and changed laws, rules and regulations. Credit 2 (2-0)
  • Clinical Literature Retrieval & Evaluation, PHCS-502. This course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory sessions designed to introduce pharmacy students to the resources available.  In addition, it deals with the basics of experimental design, research methodology, and evaluation of the current drug literature. Emphasis is placed on search strategies and provision of drug and toxicology information to health care professionals. The pedagogy for this course is primarily didactic lecture, but does have several recitation sessions. Credit 3 (2-2)
  • Selected Topics in Therapeutic III, PHCS-522. This is the third of a four course advanced series, each focusing on a certain disease state Credit 2 (2-0)
  • Selected Topics in Therapeutic IV, PHCS-523. This is the fourth of a four course advanced series, each focusing on a certain disease state Credit 2 (2-0)
  • Immunizations, PHCS-503. This course is owned by the American Pharmacists Association and is used to certify students’ knowledge and skills in the area of immunizations and vaccination. The college can provide a consultant to train your faculty to teach the course. Credit 1 (1-0)
  • Seminar, PHCS-504. A formal seminar presented by each student in P-3 class. Topics may range from patient case studies to analysis of pharmacy practice problems. Student must approach a faculty preceptor and jointly choose an appropriate topic. The seminar is directed by the faculty preceptor and would include a question and answer period including discussion. Credit 1 (0-2)

Developed by:  EduTech / COP-ITS 2017